King's Daughters Organization

Blog

the Past, Present, & Future of KDO

The Home's Garden

The rich history of the stately Victorian home at the 541 Black Avenue, from 1872 when cereal giant C.W. Post built his family home to 2007 when the Carrie Post King’s Daughters Home for Women closed its doors, is well documented.  Throughout this history are several accounts of the garden behind the Home.

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Jennifer Sylvia
Circle History

The vibrant history of The King’s Daughters Organization’s continues to shine bright. Continue reading to learn more about how KDO’s ‘circles of friendship’ evolved and the service each circle has provided to the community. Please continue to join us as we highlight our 125 years of history!!

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Jennifer Sylvia
25th Anniversary: WWI & Influenza

 In 1918, the King’s Daughters Organization celebrated their 25th anniversary. This celebration took place during the time of World War I and also during a severe influenza outbreak that occurred in 1918 and 1919. We are thankful for the hardworking women that kept this organization running even during times of turmoil and sickness.

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Jennifer Sylvia
The 1916 Infantile Paralysis Epidemic

What exactly is Infantile Paralysis and what does it have to do with the history of KDO? 

In the early nineteenth century Polio was often known as Infantile Paralysis. With Polio being eradicated in the U.S. in the late 1970’s, we often forget or are not aware of the impact this disease had on the Sangamon County community. 

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Jennifer Sylvia
Easter Weekend Years Past

Easter weekend in the years past, through some beautiful 1907 poetry and a 1978 ice storm detailed in the minutes of the oldest circle still in existence, of the King’s Daughters Organization, The Willing Circle.

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Jennifer Sylvia
Closing of the Home

From every ending comes a new beginning. It was a very tough decision on the part of the King’s Daughters Organization to close the home for aged women they had run for over 100 years. Click here to read more about the relationship with the Community Foundation for the Land of Lincoln and new beginnings.

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Jennifer Sylvia
Hannah Palmer part 2

Although out of order, last week we looked at her second marriage to a governor, general and his link to Lincoln, let’s look at Leigh Kimball, Hannah’s first husband.  He was friends of Mary Todd and Abraham, helping them to get together and even attending their wedding that was thrown together so quickly the cake was still warm.  Let’s look at his interesting life and help us to understand the ties of Leigh, Hannah, Lincoln and how this all ties into the King’s Daughters Organization

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Jennifer Sylvia
Hannah Lamb Palmer

Hannah Palmer was the president of King’s Daughters Organization from May 1898 until May 1909. She was an impressive woman behind a great man who was a General, ex-governor of Illinois, and friend to Abraham Lincoln.

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Jennifer Sylvia
Illinois Centennial Award

When the King’s Daughters Organization (then known as The Carrie Post King’s Daughters Home for Women) received the July 16, 1999 letter of invitation to apply for the Illinois Centennial Award, it didn’t take KDO Historian Sharon Hohimer long to begin collecting the legal documentation to apply!

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Jennifer Sylvia
Mrs. Mary Ralston, daughter of William Herndon

You might remember something about the Lincoln- Herndon law office. Did you know that William Herndon’s daughter, Mary Ralston, lived in the King’s Daughters home for nine years before her death at age 99? She is believed to have been the last living person connected to the Lincoln family and the end of that. See the following SJR articles with memories, a photo at the gravesite from 1917 when William Herndon received a new headstone (Mary is the second from the gravestone on the left in black, she was 61 at this time), and some memories and a recipe Mary was known for from the late KDO historian Sharon Hohimer.

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Jennifer Sylvia
Our History

Honoring 125 years of the King’s Daughters in Springfield. Before there was Social Security, retirement accounts, or Mothers Day, and the state of Illinois was only 70 years old- there was the King’s Daughters. Like us and Follow us this year as we post pictures, articles, and remembrances from the past 125 years. See the rich history and ties to Lincoln, General Foods and Mar-a-Lago, and the women involved with the 50 plus circles and memberships exceeding 1500. Times are changing, but all the while this dynamic group of women have kept on a mission- to aid the life of the elderly. From 1883-2018 going strong, always positively impacting the elderly then and now more than ever. Check out some of the members from this 1965 article

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Ryan Flynn
The Willing Circle

125 years Ago Plus….. And so the first King’s Daughters Circle began! The first circle of ten formed here in Springfield and was called the Whatsoever Circle of Christ Church. Next was the Pastor’s Ten of the Congregational Church, the Chautauqua Willing Band, and then the Tongue Guard Circle, a class of 26 girls in the St. Agatha school whose object was to guard that “unruly member”, the tongue. Some of the circles have come and gone but the Willing Ten is still with us but updated their name to the Willing Circle. A name that has forever been a synonym for active work in the organization! (128 years, before even incorporation)

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Ryan Flynn
The Rug Factory

In 1903 at the 10th Annual Meeting of the Corporation of King’s Daughter’s held at the Central Baptist church, Dr. A.L. Converse spoke on behalf of C.W. Post, Carrie Post’s son. In an effort to make the Home partly self-supporting, it was suggested by Mr.Post to have a RUG FACTORY in connection with the Home, in which all “able bodied inmates” (residence) should work several hours per day!! The idea was VERY unpopular and the rug factory did not materialize. 

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Ryan Flynn
Willis L. and Mary S. Spaulding

The King's Daughters Organization history is rich in selfless acts from those with a passion for improving our community. Without these generous gifts, Kings Daughters would not be the organization we are today. We have become one of the most charitable organizations in Sangamon County with the support of the Willis L. and Mary S. Spaulding Educational Trust. What a legacy!

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Ryan Flynn
Mrs. Phoebe Dreake Cleveland

When the "Sangamon County King's Daughters Home for Old Ladies" (as the home was known then) opened October 7,1895, one of its 5 original "inmates", as the ladies were called, was Mrs. Phoebe Dreake Cleveland. She was the only real daughter of the American Revolution in this vicinity. Read more about her family in the SJR article. The King's Daughters helped to buy a special bronze tablet and attended the unveiling in 1923.

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Ryan Flynn